Soap, Soup, and Salvation Army

The Salvation Army began in 1865 when William Booth, a London minister, gave up the comfort of his pulpit and decided to take to the streets where his message and service would reach the poor, the homeless, the hungry and the destitute. His method was unheard of and controversial, even attracting persecution. For a period, he and his supporters were dubbed, “Soap, Soup and Salvation Army.”

Today, The Salvation Army has dramatically grown since Booth’s time, but our work continues to be inspired by his example of boldly searching out and serving the most vulnerable among us.

A modern day version of out Booth’s street outreach can be seen at an event that took place this week in New Jersey. In one of the area’s most poverty stricken neighborhoods, the local Salvation Army brought out a food truck and distributed soup, coffee, and coats to anyone in need.

In a community with high rates of homelessness, Salvation Army officer Terrell Curry explained, “We want to go where no one goes.”

Read more about The Salvation Army reaching out to this neglected neighborhood here.

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