Work Program Helps Rebuild Lives and Landscapes

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The Salvation Army in Dallas, TX recently launched a new commercial landscape management business to help companies keep their facilities looking sharp while also providing jobs, training, counseling and income for people who would otherwise be unemployed.

The Socially Responsible Landscape Management Company has two crews of 12 workers, all of who live at The Salvation Army homeless shelter until they save enough money to live on their own, capable of doing just about everything from lawn mowing to sprinkler installation and repair.

While each employee is trained by a professional lawn care supervisor (you’ll be amazed at what they can do!), the goal of the program is to help these individuals gain experience and self-sufficiency so they can move onto other full time work.

The entire project was funded by donations from local advisory board members, who helped purchase equipment and acquire knowledgeable management. The company is working to add more jobs, in hopes of providing brighter futures for a greater number of homeless individuals in Dallas.

“The workers are overcoming many barriers to employment, including the very fact that they are homeless,” said Donnie Freeman, Social Enterprise Manager for The Salvation Army’s Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex Command. “Some have had issues with drug and alcohol abuse, and even though they’ve completed treatment, the stigma remains. By working on a landscaping crew and proving they are reliable, they become eligible to receive letters of recommendation and assistance in attaining full-time employment.”

Services include law mowing, edging, weed removal, tree trimming and planting, flower bed maintenance, mulching, sodding, seeding, shrub pruning, pre-emergent fire ant treatment, and sprinkler installation and repair.

Rebuild your landscape and the lives of those in need by calling 214.637.8215 for a free estimate.  All profits help fund The Salvation Army’s critical social service programs.

Read more in the Dallas Business Journal.