Move Over, Johnny Appleseed

Thursday, June 23, 2011

Remember the story we posted a few months ago about a Salvation Army Thrift Store’s new organic compost initiative? (Refresh your memory here.)

The popular, budding business is helping support another green initiative in Billings, Montana. With the help of more than a dozen volunteers, The Salvation Army is transforming a neighboring vacant lot into a mini orchard. The homeless men in charge of the Army’s compost project used their homemade fertilizer in the planting of 50 apple trees, and they plan to get a total of 300 in the ground!

The trees will go to support the local community’s children who will harvest the fruit for their families to eat, as well as make and sell apple products. The profits they earn will go into a college fund. What an incredible resource for the community!

This project is part of a larger Salvation Army initiative in Billings to create gardens throughout the city over the next few years, and we’re excited to see it unfold. Read more about The Salvation Army’s community apple orchard at the Billings Gazette.

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June 29: See You at Buffalo Wild Wings!

Thursday, June 23, 2011

On Wednesday, June 29, Buffalo Wild Wings will donate 10% of food/non-alcoholic beverage sales to our tornado relief efforts. More than 400 restaurants are participating nation-wide, which will help The Salvation Army serve even more survivors as they rebuild their lives and homes.

All you need to do is say that you’re dining to support tornado survivors. That’s the easy part. When it comes to choosing between their 14 amazing sauces (Sweet BBQ? Parmesan Garlic? Mango Habanero?), you’ll have to make up your own mind.

Go to www.buffalowildwings.com to find your local restaurant, and visit www.salvationarmyusa.org to donate directly to our disaster relief efforts.

And be sure to show us how you’re “Doing the Most Good” by uploading and tagging a photo of your dining experience on our Facebook wall @SalvationArmyUSA!

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WSJ: How to Raise a Philanthropist

Tuesday, June 21, 2011

The Wall Street Journal published an article this week about a growing trend among affluent families of teaching their children the importance of giving. Thankfully, “doing good” is not dependant on financial status!

There are always opportunities to pass along to the younger generation the value of helping others. The article suggests practical ideas applicable to any parent, like simply talking about the “good feeling” you get from giving, bringing children with you to volunteer and visit charities, or letting kids educate parents on causes they care about, rather than the other way around.

We believe philanthropy is a vital life lesson that you’re never too young to learn. Here are just a few ways The Salvation Army can help your family put some of these suggestions into practice:

* Have your kids collect their old clothes and toys for giveaway and bring them with you to donate to a Salvation Army Family Thrift Store. Make the experience even more impactful by explaining how their gift will benefit people in need, and use the videos and resources at our website www.satruck.org to show them real life stories.

* Make volunteering a family event, such as serving meals together at a Salvation Army shelter or being bell ringers. Visit your local Salvation Army corps to learn how you can help address your community’s specific needs.

* Empower children to donate financially. Have them fill out the online donation form for you or let them click the “Donate Now” button. Give them some change to put in the Christmas Red Kettle, or help them host their own online Red Kettle. You could even ask them if they’d like to put a percentage of their allowance toward supporting The Salvation Army.

* Find out what they’re passionate about. The Salvation Army serves a vast range of needs that they can get involved with or learn more about on our website. Maybe they have a desire to help other kids or feel strongly about supporting disaster survivors – they could get started right away by sending a child in need to summer camp or donating to our disaster relief efforts.

* Make special occasions about ‘others.’ Start a family tradition to make a donation in your child’s name on their birthday, purchase and give a toy at Christmas time for a child in need through Salvation Army Angel Tree, or serve a meal together at a Salvation Army shelter at Thanksgiving.

* Put your money where your mouth is. Offer to match a donation that your child makes. Set a long-term goal to work towards to give your child a greater sense of accomplishment and help your family work together as a team.

* Gear school and extra-curricular projects towards philanthropic causes. Programs such as Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts require participants to design and implement service projects. Many children and young adults have worked with The Salvation Army to complete their assignments and benefit their communities in the process.

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Daily News: Students exceed fundraising goal in tornado, flood relief efforts

Monday, June 20, 2011

Article published with permission from author Allison Roorda of the Faribault Daily News

Members of the Divine Mercy Catholic School student council, from left to right, Kelsey Novak, Shelby Meyer, Patrick Swenson, Zachary Schwab, Brendan Trump and Garrett Johnson. (Allison Roorda/Daily News)

When the sixth-grade members of the Divine Mercy Catholic School student council in Minnesota set out to raise money for the victims of tornadoes and flooding in the south, their goal was $700.
After several weeks and many different opportunities for fundraising, they ended up with $1,705.11.

“We just decided that it would be cool to help the tornado and flood victims down south,” said Kelsey Novak, president of the student council.
For weeks the six senior student council members worked on a variety of ways to raise the money, said Betsy Thomas.

“One of the reasons was we’ve been praying for these people since those devastating tornadoes hit down south,” said Thomas, who teaches sixth grade and also acts as the student council adviser at DMCS. “They just felt like they wanted to do more than just pray.”
The students were adamant about their contributions.

“As a Christian school, one of our biggest duties as Christians is to help others,” said Shelby Meyer, secretary of the student council. “So when we got the chance, we took it.”
The students got permission to take up collections at student Masses and at the dress rehearsal and performance of the annual school concert.

“It was a long two weeks of raising money,” Meyer said. “I think we spent at least half a day just running around the school, hanging up flyers and stuff.”

One of the major fundraisers ended up being the school’s Dress Down Day.
“We do this all year long,” Thomas said. “For a dollar the kids can be out of dress code. The kids decided they had a $2 dress down fee, and many people donated even more than $2. The class that contributed the most got a dress down pass they can use any time for two weeks.”

Normally, any money collected for DMCS’s Dress Down Days goes to various charities. The student council members decided to donate money they raised with their own Dress Down Day to the Salvation Army, according to Thomas.

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Camping We Will Go

Tuesday, June 14, 2011

The first official day of summer is only 1 week away, and most schools have either dismissed for the year or are getting ready to. For students, this means nearly 3 amazing months to play, explore, and just be a kid!

There’s nothing that greater epitomizes the summer experience as camp. Last year, more than 180,500 kids explored the outdoors, participated in sports, created arts & crafts, played music, learned about the Bible and more at our Salvation Army summer camps and day camps across the country.

Many camps are already in enrolling. You can register your child for a summer camp by contacting your local Salvation Army (search by zip code here) or a day camp by contacting a Kroc Center near you.

If you don’t have kids, you can help provide a camp scholarship to a child in need by donating to your local Salvation Army. In the article “Summer Camp Memories” published in the June 11 War Cry, contributor Laurie Miller fondly recounts The Salvation Army’s Camp Arnold at Timberlake in Eatonville, Washington, which she described as her “home away from home for seven summers” when she was growing up.

After explaining that many of her fellow campers came from broken homes and abusive family situations, Laurie writes:

“For years, I thought camp was just a free vacation I deserved as a child. Later, when I learned a fee was involved, I wondered how my mom could afford to send me each year. Not until I was an adult in my 20s did I realize that a woman from our church had sponsored us to go every year. I’m not sure she ever really knew how much going to Camp Arnold truly meant to me.”

As Laurie shows us, the experiences of a summer can impact the rest of a camper’s life. Whether you send your own child to camp or help to send someone else’s, consider how you can help The Salvation Army make a difference in a young person’s life this summer.

For more information about how The Salvation Army serves approximately 30 million Americans in need every year, visit our website at www.salvationarmyusa.org or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

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Raising Up Hope, Every Night of the Week

Friday, June 10, 2011

The Salvation Army
PO Box 21787
St. Louis, MO 63109
Please designate the gift “Joplin Tornado”

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Three Cheers for National Doughnut Day!

Friday, June 3, 2011

During World War I, approximately 250 Salvation Army volunteers provided assistance to our American soldiers fighting on the front lines in France starting in 1917.

As the young soldiers faced physical and emotional peril amidst the fighting, female Salvation Army officers Ensign Margaret Sheldon and Adjutant Helen Purviance had the idea to comfort them with good home cooking, using their limited ingredients to fry up in helmets delicious doughnuts for the boys.

These women, earning the nickname “Doughnut Lassies” and “Doughnut Girls,” served countless treats to grateful soldiers, traversing through the trenches to bring the men doughnuts and coffee. More than just filling an empty stomach, these doughnuts and the joyful presence of the women who worked so hard to make them provided the soldiers with the boost their spirits needed during an extraordinarily difficult time. They also provided writing supplies, stamps, and clothes-mending for the men.

The doughnuts became an instant hit that was brought back to America by returning “doughboys.”

Doughnut Lassies fed hungry American soldiers serving on the front lines during WWI.

The Salvation Army celebrated the first National Doughnut Day in 1938 in the city of Chicago as a way to honor Salvation Army “doughnut lassies” from World War I. They started the Day as a way to raise funds and bring awareness to the Army’s social service programs during the Great Depression.

And today, 73 years later, we continue that tradition to help raise awareness for the critical services we provide to 30 million Americans in need each year! If you’d like to help support The Salvation Army on National Doughnut Day, please text the word “DONUT” to 80888 to make a $10 donation.

Below are just a few ways we’re celebrating across the country. For a full list and more info, click here.

* Augusta, ME: The Salvation Army will offer free doughnuts and coffee between 7a.m. and 10a.m. at the Tim Hortons on Western Avenue.
* Chicago, IL: Community members can help The Salvation Army “Erase Hunger” on June 3rd and 4th. Fundraisers will be on the streets handing out commemorative Doughnut Day tags to donors to help support feeding programs for children, seniors, the homeless and families in need.
* Hampton, VA: The Salvation Army and Krispy Kreme are partnering to provide doughnuts to Salvation Army clients, including members of senior programs.
* Los Angeles, CA: BakeMark will make a $10,000 donation to support The Salvation Army’s Haven Shelter in West Los Angeles. The Salvation Army will also provide free doughnuts and coffee to veterans at the Haven served by volunteers in “Lassie” uniforms.
* Phoenix, AZ: Community members who donate gently used items to a Salvation Army Family Store on June 3rd will receive a free Dunkin’s Donut and a coupon for a free dozen Dunkin’ Donuts.

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For You, A Salvation Army-Style Doughnut Recipe

Thursday, June 2, 2011

With the 73rd National Doughnut Day only 1 day away (is your mouth watering yet?), we thought we’d share a special treat with you a little bit early.

If you’re lucky, on Friday you may come across your local Salvation Army unit passing out doughnuts from our partners like Dunkin Donuts, Krispy Kreme, or local stores. We have a lot of love for all these great doughnut brands, BUT for those of you who are real go-getters, we’re going to help you celebrate do-it-yourself style.

Below, we’re sharing The Salvation Army’s original doughnut recipe, just like our “doughnut lassies” used to make on the front lines for American soldiers during WWI and WWII. They say it’s because of these women that doughnuts became such a popular treat in the US!

Give it a try, and let us know if you think your doughnuts are good enough to have their own annual celebration.

[Stella Young]
Salvation Army Doughnut Girl Stella Young

SALVATION ARMY LASSIES’ DOUGHNUT RECIPE

Yield: 4 doz. doughnuts

5 C flour
2 C sugar
5 tsp. baking powder
1 ‘saltspoon’ salt
2 eggs
1 3/4 C milk
1 T lard

DIRECTIONS

* Combine all ingredients (except for lard) to make dough.

* Thoroughly knead dough, roll smooth, and cut into rings that are less than 1/4 inch thick. (When finding items to cut out doughnut circles, be creative! Salvation Army doughnut girls used whatever they could find, from baking powder cans to coffee percolator tubes.)

* Drop the rings into the lard, making sure the fat is hot enough to brown the doughnuts gradually. Turn the doughnuts slowly several times.

* When browned, remove doughnuts and allow excess fat to drip off.

* Dust with powdered sugar. Let cool and enjoy.

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Only 3 Days ‘Til National Doughnut Day!

Tuesday, May 31, 2011

Ever since 1938, The Salvation Army has been celebrating our doughnut-making heritage on the first Friday of June.

The celebration began in Chicago as a way to pay homage to the young women who fed and fueled soldiers during WWI and WWII with hand-made doughnuts.

After more than 70 years, we continue that tradition this Friday, June 3 with tasty events taking place from the east coast to the west! We hope you’ll join with your local Salvation Army in honoring Doughnut Day.

Take a moment to read this post on the Western Territory’s Expect Change blog to learn the rich history behind this tradition, and we guarantee it will make your Doughnut Day even sweeter.

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It’s on the Internet? It Must be True!

Tuesday, May 31, 2011

Warning: don’t believe everything you read online.

Whenever there’s a major natural disaster somewhere in the world, the internet rumor mill begins churning. Then all sorts of false messages circulate throughout the web, even ones that make The Salvation Army look good!

In the Expect Change blog’s article “Don’t believe every internet rumor you read!,” The Salvation Army Western Territory sets the record straight on the tales of the misinformation superhighway.

We’re proud of The Salvation Army’s strong record of good stewardship with your donations, so we don’t see any reason to stretch the truth.

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