Look for Us at Daytona!

Wednesday, February 9, 2011

[Morgan Shepard The Salvation Army Daytona car 2011. ©Phil Cavali]
Morgan Shepherd will race his #89 Salvation Army Nationwide Series car at Daytona on Feb 19. ©Phil Cavali

Tune in to NASCAR’s Daytona 500 on February 19, and you’ll see The Salvation Army racing around the track!

That’s because NASCAR veteran Morgan Shepherd has generously “donated” the hood of his #89 Nationwide Series race car to our organization and will be sporting our Red Shield and ‘Doing the Most Good’ brand promise.

At age 69, Shepherd is the founder of Victory in Jesus Racing Ministries, and while he’s got a small team with limited means, he’s still searching for opportunities to give back.

“There are millions in our country right now who have lost their jobs, their homes, and their spirit,” Shepherd said. “The demand is very high and we thought we could take our “ministry on wheels” to a higher level and assist The Salvation Army when they need it the most. I’ve been blessed in so many ways over my career, and this is a way of giving back in honor of our fans and supporters. We don’t have much, but what we have, we can “donate” to The Salvation Army.”

Get to know more about our newest partner and driver of #89 Salvation Army Nationwide Series Team through the below Q &A. We hope you’ll root for Morgan Shepherd on race day! Learn more about his efforts at WWW.RACEWITHFAITH.COM

Q: How Long have you been racing?

A: “I’ve been racing in Nascar since 1970. I’ve been racing for The Lord Jesus Christ since I found him in 1975. Over 40 years total and over 800 races.”

Q: What’s (What does) it feel like to represent The Salvation Army in Nascar?

A: “Well, you gotta respect anything that’s been around longer than I have.(laughs). But Man! What an honor. The Salvation Army has been around for what, over 130 years? They are so dedicated to “doing the most good” for those in need helping the needy and the impoverished and most importantly in a Christian manner that makes our team really excited to show off their Red Shield and “Doing The Most Good” motto branding promise at Daytona.”

Q: What is Morgan Shepherd’s motto?

A: I’ve read and been told to hang it up or retire. I’m too old, or we don’t have the funding to compete. But I feel really good, my health is fine, I take care of myself, and most importantly, I have faith. So my
motto is simple, “Faith is something you believe in when common sense tells you not to.”

Q: You say you feel great, but do you have the tools necessary to compete against drivers 1/2 to 1/3rd your age and teams with far superior technology and equipment?

A: “The most powerful tool I have is the power of prayer. Don’t underestimate it. You hear people say when things go bad, Why did God do this to me? Sometimes God has nothing to do with it. Sometimes you turn your back on him and you’re on your own. Bad things can happen to good people. They lose their jobs, their homes, their car, and then their spirit. Prayer is always the answer. Don’t turn your back on the Lord Jesus Christ. Pray hard and often and he will listen, and do what he feels is right for you.”

Q: Any racing goals for 2011?

A: “Well we certainly would like to put The Salvation Army in the winners circle, but we are a very small team with limited funding compared to many of the other teams, so realistically, I’d like to be the oldest driver in Nascar’s upper-two levels to finish a race in the Top 10. I think the record is 59 years of age. I’d like to get a Top 10. We’ve come close the last couple of years, but it just didn’t fall our way. I have faith we can do it.”

Q: Morgan, you are very spiritual. Any favorite passages from The Bible?

A: “Well I always like the story of David and Goliath. The original underdog story. David had no chance, but young David took out a rock and set it in his sling and slung it. Striking the phillistine in the head, and he fell to the ground. I feel like David sometimes. But I’d say my favorite passage would be Hebrews 12:1….LET US RUN WITH ENDURANCE THE RACE GOD HAS SET BEFORE US.”

To follow Morgan Shepherd and The Salvation Army Race Team, visit www.racewithfaith.com, or go to www.salvationarmyusa.org.

Chefs for Hope

Tuesday, February 8, 2011

A few months ago, they were homeless or barely getting by. Many of them had no background in cooking. But just last weekend they were working alongside several of Louisville’s top chefs, preparing and serving $250-a-plate dinners to a crowd of 100 diners at the ‘Chefs for Hope’ benefit.

They are the newest students of The Salvation Army Louisville’s Culinary Training Program, which provides homeless and low-income individuals with the skills they need to earn jobs in the food service industry. And while they may still be searching for permanent housing or a steady job, they’re now getting the experience and support they need to make it happen.

The ‘Chefs for Hope’ benefit is just one part of the students’ months-long intensive training, but it provides a unique and encouraging opportunity for them to work alongside local culinary stars. Louisville’s Courier-Journal ran a great article about the event, the proceeds from which will support the Culinary Training Program.

After reading about the six course meal and appetizers, no doubt you and I both wish we could have been at that dinner, but don’t worry! Next week, just in time for Valentine’s Day, we’re going to feature some special recipes from the Culinary Training Program’s head chef Josh Arnold.

Be sure to check our blog Monday for some edible inspirations from The Salvation Army’s kitchen.

Salvation Army Youth in Super Bowl XLV Spot

Monday, February 7, 2011

Kids from The Salvation Army Cedar Crest Community Center joined Dallas Cowboy DeMarcus Ware in a Super Bowl XLV TV spot! Ware recited part of the Declaration of…

Get To Know General-elect Commissioner Linda Bond

Monday, February 7, 2011

[General-elect Linda Bond]
Salvation Army General-elect Linda Bond

The following is an excerpt of an interview with The Salvation Army’s General-elect Commissioner Linda Bond. Commissioner Bond will serve as our organization’s world leader beginning in April of this year. To read the full interview, click here.

1. Please tell us about yourself and your background.

I was born in Nova Scotia, Canada, as the youngest of 13 children. My mother was British, migrating to Canada with her parents when she was 17-years-old. My Canadian father was a coal miner.

The coal mining town and political environment in which I was raised also affected the way I view life and I thank the Lord for this. The marginalized, the poor and the addicted were part of the community landscape, and my parents were committed to seeing things change for the hurting. This was consistent with what I later learned to be the Lord’s mission – and the Army’s.

2. Can you please describe your thoughts and feelings when you were nominated for and then elected as General of The Salvation Army?

When I was nominated I felt it was an affirmation from my peers. My overall feeling was that ‘this is of the Lord’. He had been speaking to my heart through Scripture, and although I had not intended to, I accepted nomination in obedience to the Lord. I felt that I had to wait to see what he wanted to do. When I was elected I was humbled, but I had a real sense that this was the Lord’s doing. To me it was a miracle – it was a work of grace.

3. How is the election of a Salvation Army General different from the election of a political leader?

Well, there is no lobbying, for one thing! The major difference is that it is bathed in prayer. Unlike a political election, only a certain group have a vote yet all the Salvationists are praying for the High Council members to be granted wisdom by the Spirit.

4. Please describe spiritual leadership in a Salvation Army context.

I have very deep convictions about spiritual leadership, and for many years I taught classes on spiritual authority. To me the first point of spiritual authority is that power belongs to God. The power that he delegates to us has to be a power of love, the power to die to self, the power to live for others, the power for people and not over people.

5. Please outline the Army’s mission and explain how it is relevant and valid around the world today.

Well, everybody seems to quote Retired General John Gowans and I, too, think he captured the mission of The Salvation Army in his phrase ‘Save souls, grow saints and serve suffering humanity’.

Salvationists seem to know instinctively that the Army was raised up by God to connect people to Jesus. They also know that we believe that people can be holy now, that they can be Christlike. It’s in our DNA to serve. So that is the mission of the Army and those are the guideposts for us.

How is it relevant? Well, the world needs Jesus – that’s pretty relevant, isn’t it? The ills of mankind are not going to be addressed by any other means, except through the Cross of Christ. When we talk about the relevance of holiness, this world needs to see that the people of God make holiness believable. It needs to see authentic, deep Christians who live out the life of Jesus and do not just talk about it.

There is suffering humanity – all we have to do is watch television on any given night or look around our communities and say ‘We need Christians with their sleeves rolled up’.

6. What are some of the strengths of the Army worldwide?

Our name, because we are known in most places and are found trustworthy. Trustworthiness is a huge part of what makes us effective. People trust us and we never want to lose that.

Another strength of the Army, I believe, is its mission, which is so clearly defined. You would be hard pressed to find a Salvationist who did not know the mission. There is something about being very clear about our purpose that makes The Salvation Army as effective as it is.

Our visibility is also a strength. People recognize our uniforms and logos.

We have a long history yet we are known in society as an organization that is able to change its methods to relate to each generation while holding true to its essential principles. We must continue to do this, to be adaptable and flexible but principled.

7. What will be the main challenges facing you as General?

It is a challenge to serve in a very complex world without losing sight of our mission. We must also serve in a secular world and never be ashamed of Jesus. Both will take courage, wisdom and grace.

8. How do you hope to use the latest technology in communicating with the worldwide Army? A question has been asked already: Are we going to have a blog?

I like using technology actually – I just love it! We need to explore every means to use technology to best advantage in order to fulfill our mission to the world.

As for a blog – again, for me it would be a matter of finding the time. But more importantly, I hope to visit and travel frequently, and I know from experience that in many parts of the Army world, it can be extremely difficult if not impossible to get on-line. But the Office of the General will require me to communicate by every means possible. I will do that. For many, they will expect to hear of these travels through a blog. Others will welcome regular electronic letters. But best of all is face-to-face contact and travelling will give lots of opportunity for this.

9. Is there anything else you would like to add?

I have to thank The Salvation Army. I’ve had hundreds of messages from all over the world and I am a bit overwhelmed by it all. I want to thank people who offered Scripture – people keep sending me Scripture. People offer congratulations but they also promise prayer support. There is no greater gift that someone can give to me. I need prayer.

I would love to be strong and energetic and healthy and totally committed to what the Lord called me into this position for. I just want to do what he has called me to do.