Salvation Army Ranks Among Top 10 Non-Profits

Wednesday, March 10, 2010

The Salvation Army ranks among the top 10 most trusted non-profit organizations in America, according to results of Harris Interactive’s EquiTrend annual brand equity poll.

The study measures more than 1,000 brands across 42 different categories, including 59 non-profit brands.

The Salvation Army emerged in the top 10 rankings in categories of:

* Most Trusted (10)
* Brand Equity (6)
* To Which People are Most Likely to Give (5)

You can read the full article in The NonProfit Times.

According to Harris Interactive, this year’s EquiTrend® study was conducted online among 19,708 U.S. consumers ages 15 and over between January 12 and 21, 2010. The total number of brands rated was 1,151, and each respondent was asked to rate a total of 60 randomly selected brands.

For more information about the life changing work of The Salvation Army,visit our national website at www.salvationarmyusa.org or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Water Well from Years Past Put to Good Use

Tuesday, March 9, 2010

Sometimes our plans turn out to be even better than we could have ever expected.

More than five years ago Major Juan Gutierrez, a Salvation Army minister at Hualpencillo, Chile dug a well with which to water the lawns and gardens around the Salvation Army property. He never used it, but today the well is an important component of The Salvation Army’s response to last month’s devastating magnitude 8.8 earthquake.

The current corps officer, Major Abraham Marin, installed a pump for the well last week and there is now a source of clean water which can be used by those who are being helped by The Salvation Army. Hualpencillo is where The Salvation Army established the emergency disaster headquarters for the southern region of Chile.

Major Juan Carlos Alarcon, Divisional Commander of The Salvation Army’s Chile South Division, said, “I spoke with Major Gutierrez by telephone to advise him that members of his family who live in the [earthquake] zone are safe. At the same time, I thanked him for drilling the well, which is now helping hundreds of families. In Hualpencillo, we are not only providing food, but fresh spring water as well.”

Don’t Forget – Meal Packing Event March 12, 13

Tuesday, March 9, 2010

The Salvation Army’s next meal packing event for Haiti disaster relief will take place in the Los Angeles, CA area on Friday, March 12 and Saturday, March 13, 2010. If you live in or near this area, come show your support for those in need by rolling up your sleeves and helping! Our goal is 1 million meals, so bring your friends!

Again, here are the details:

WHAT: Million Meals for Haiti Packaging Event with The Salvation Army and Numana

WHO: You and Anyone Else You Can Recruit (ages 12 yrs.or older, please!)

WHEN: Teams are being recruited for the following shifts:
Friday, March 12
8:00AM to 12:00PM
12:00PM to 4:00PM
4:00PM to 8:00PM

Saturday, March 13
8:00AM to 12:00PM
12:00PM to 4:00PM
4:00PM to 8:00PM

WHERE: The Salvation Army’s warehouse at 5600 Rickenbacker Road, Building 1C and 1D, Bell, California. Click here for a map to the Bell warehouse.

And don’t forget to register online!

For more information, visit The Salvation Army’s Southern California website. You can also find helpful details on their blog and Facebook page.

Two Armies – One Mission

Tuesday, March 9, 2010

The following was submitted by The Salvation Army’s Stacy Howard, who is serving as the Public Information Officer for Haiti Incident Command in Port-au-Prince:

“Both armies wear a uniform; both are respected as two of the most organized groups in the world; both have a common mission in Haiti.

The Salvation Army’s goal is to help survivors of the massive quake with a hand up – to provide support through basic need, medical and spiritual assistance. The U.S. Army’s Haiti Relief Mission: Provide humanitarian support to the country’s surviving population, most of which have been injured or affected by the earthquake in some way. Together the two armies have formed a unique and powerful partnership since the quake. Together they assist, aid, protect and serve.

“The Salvation Army was receptive and there was mutual respect,” said Lt. Cody Tinsley, 1 Platoon, A Company, 2 Battalion, 325 Air Infantry Regiment regarding the first of what became many joint missions of food distribution. As the platoon leader, Tinsley led operations that included safely escorting The Salvation Army staff and distribution items via military convoy and security for the nearly 8,000 displaced families. While the U.S. military took charge of security measures, The Salvation Army ran the distribution. At the twice-a-week event, nearly 16,000 people received boxed meals provided by Numana, buckets and bottles of cooking oil.

(L to R) The Salvation Army Haiti Command Distribution Coordinator Jonathan Fitzgerald, 1 Platoon, A Company, 2 Battalion, 325 Air infantry Regiment Lt. Cody Tinsley and The Salvation Army Haiti Comman d Public Information Officer Stacy Howard prepare to distribute food to nearly 8,000 families.
(L to R) The Salvation Army Haiti Command Distribution Coordinator Jonathan Fitzgerald, 1 Platoon, A Company, 2 Battalion, 325 Air infantry Regiment Lt. Cody Tinsley and The Salvation Army Haiti Command Public Information Officer Stacy Howard prepare to distribute food to nearly 8,000 families.

As expected immediately after the quake, disorder and chaos ensued from thousands who rushed for the items. Tinsley said together, both Armies quickly controlled the situation after assessing the needs and safety issues of all involved.

Once distributions became a regular mission of the Armies, the ebb and flow made it simple for families to be served. At post-mission debriefings the two Armies discussed ways to improve distribution, shared ideas and came up with a plan that worked for everyone, Tinsley said. Because of mutual respect and trust, each Army let the other take the lead in the area they knew best.

In the end, the Haitian disaster relief is a humanitarian mission for both Armies. Despite the sometimes intimidating appearance the U.S. military might portray, as Tinsley said, they adapt to the mission. They realize this is not a war zone. They aren’t here to occupy, they’re here to protect and serve – and at times, even entertain.

Several members of the platoon played music and danced to entertain the families in line. The children’s faces lit up. Tinsley said it’s important to remind the survivors we’re all here to help – whether it’s with food, security or a little comedic relief.

The Salvation Army has been in Haiti since 1950, and will remain. The U.S. Army will also stay as long as they’re needed to provide support. Whether in Haiti, or elsewhere in the world, The Salvation Army and U.S. Army have and will continue to partner during disaster relief operations with a joint goal: Restore humanity and hope.

Two armies – one mission.”

To stay updated on The Salvation Army’s work, visit our national website at www.salvationarmyusa.org or follow us on Facebook and