One in a Billion: Anti-Human Trafficking in India

Wednesday, November 13, 2013
2013 One in a Billion AHT in India

India’s population now stands at a little more than 1.2 billion. One way to visualize India’s population density when compared with the United States is to imagine four…

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Answering Complications with Compassion for Fishermen in Japan

Monday, September 30, 2013
Photo-Japan-1

Isolation can create unforeseen complications. In a well-known biblical account, Jesus and his disciples withdrew to an isolated area, but were followed by crowds who sought healing and…

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The Before and After Picture of Transformational Love

Tuesday, September 17, 2013
9.11.13 - SAWSO Blog Photo 1

A woman in Zambia waits at her makeshift stand at the edge of the road hoping someone will buy from her meager store of charcoal and sweet potatoes. …

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A Woman of Substance

Monday, July 1, 2013
Chemka-A Woman of Substance

Hope is a powerful virtue.  Opportunity to engender hope in the lives of others is transformational.  A Kenyan woman named Chemka, from the village of Sabatia Gurugwa, is…

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Salvation Army Today, March 14

Thursday, March 14, 2013

This week’s Salvation Army Today video – brought to you by The Salvation Army Southern Territory – covers The Salvation Army’s continued response in Japan two years after the devastating tsunami, and features one…

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Japan Tsunami Recovery Continues With Help from Salvation Army

Monday, March 11, 2013
Japan Forklift Donation

Contributed by Brian Swarts, Assistant Program Director – Strategic Planning for The Salvation Army World Service Office (SAWSO). Two years ago today, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake struck off the…

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Salvation Army World Service Office: 36 Years of Improving Lives Around the Globe

Wednesday, January 30, 2013
A Salvation Army school in Africa. One of SAWSO's goals for expansion is to support educational programs around the world.

  Fueled by the support of donors and partners in mission, The Salvation Army World Service Office (SAWSO) finds lasting solutions to poverty around the world through community…

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Haiti: SAWSO’s Life-Saving Solutions for a Nation in Need

Wednesday, July 25, 2012
haiti_salvationarmy_36

Among the 25,000 attendees at the 19th annual International Aids Conference happening right now in Washington, DC are representatives of The Salvation Army’s World Service Office (SAWSO). This event is just one more way for SAWSO employees to hear the latest scientific developments on the disease and learn more about the global response to HIV.

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Photos: Brazil Mudslide Relief Efforts

Tuesday, February 1, 2011

Following the massive mid-January floods and landslides in Brazil, The Salvation Army continues to respond to need in affected communities. The Salvation Army of Brazil has posted photos to their Flickr account of damage and disaster relief efforts. We’ve included a few below to share with you a clearer picture of some of the work being done and the challenges that remain for survivors. You can find the full album here.

Supplies, logistical support, and more than 10 tons of donations have gone out to key areas, as well as financial support from The Salvation Army’s World Services Offices (SAWSO), the international arm of The Salvation Army USA. Local Rotary Clubs, businesses, and churches in São Paulo and Sorocaba have also pitched in to assist with disaster relief efforts. It is expected it will take months for local communities to recuperate.

If you’d like to support The Salvation Army’s Brazilian mudslide appeal, please visit https://secure20.salvationarmy.org/donation.jsp to make a donation.

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Haiti: One Year After the Earthquake

Wednesday, January 12, 2011

In Port-au-Prince today, The Salvation Army and Haitian citizens are gathering for a very special remembrance ceremony to mark the one-year anniversary of an earthquake the world will not soon forget.

The Salvation Army continues to work with the nation throughout the rebuilding process. To learn more about the ongoing efforts in the island nation, we caught up with Major Ron Busroe, Director of Haiti’s Recovery and Development Office. He and his wife first served in Haiti from 2001-2007. In response to the earthquake, they’ve been appointed to serve three more years.

Read on for a broad overview of The Salvation Army’s work and issues shaping those efforts.

For our latest statistics and program highlights, view our Haiti One Year Anniversary Fact Sheet at www.salvationarmyusa.org.

General Updates

The Salvation Army’s efforts in Haiti have progressed from the emergency response phase to the recovery and development phase. The Haiti Development and Recovery Office was established as of September 1 to oversee and guide these long-term recovery efforts, such as renovating schools and buildings as well as providing for the emotional and spiritual care of survivors.

In addition, the contract that established us as the “lead-agency” overseeing the temporary camp in the Delmas 2 neighborhood expired October 31. While The Salvation Army no longer manages the camp, our personnel remain involved and regularly meet with the camp committee. Much of our effort within this population goes toward cholera prevention.

The Salvation Army Haiti intends to move into a new Divisional Headquarters this month as their facility was destroyed in the earthquake. They also plan to rebuild their clinic this year, and perhaps even a warehouse, as storage space is a rare commodity in Haiti.

Housing and Permanent Shelter

It was estimated that around 20,000 displaced Haitians were living in the Delmas 2 neighborhood’s tent city near The Salvation Army’s main compound following the earthquake. Major Busroe estimates the number has dissipated now to somewhere just below 13,000 as people move out to the country. However, it’s been much more difficult for people wanting to start over within the city.

“Following the earthquake we’re seeing limited construction in city of Port-au-Prince. There’s some small construction, but few houses are being built. The rubble’s not removed so they can’t build, ” he explained, adding that the government’s weakened state and hurdles to verifying land ownership also inhibit progress. Reports indicate that after a year, less than 5% of the city’s rubble has been removed.

So Haitians’ only choices are to move and face the struggles of rural life (lack of access to clean water, medical services, business opportunities, education, and more) or continue to stay in their makeshift shelters.

Major Busroe says the Haitian government is encouraging NGO’s to build up resources within the rural communities in an effort to encourage people to relocate and help decongest the city. It’s a plan Major Busroe says The Salvation Army supports, though much of their service has already been focused on reaching the underserved outside the city even before the earthquake.

Cholera

While cholera is still a serious threat to the people of Haiti, the mortality rate is on the decline. In general, those under The Salvation Army’s care have fared relatively well against the outbreak, although 4 female students from one of our schools perished when the epidemic first struck.

The Salvation Army is aggressively working to educate against, prevent, and treat further infection. In addition to providing water filtration systems in key areas, Major Busroe reported they’re distributing soap, disinfectant, oral rehydration packets, and antibiotics within the temporary camp and to medical facilities. In addition, The Salvation Army hospital in Fond-de-Negres set up a cholera treatment center at the request of the government, which has been filled with patients. The hospital is looking to set up an alternate site.

Schools and Services

The Salvation Army runs 49 schools in Haiti with approx. 11,000 students enrolled. All but one of those schools, College Verena in Port-au-Prince, continue to operate following the earthquake. College Verena has been combined with another school and reconstruction efforts are expected to continue within the next year.

23 temporary classrooms have already been built and will officially open today as a part of the one-year remembrance ceremony. More than 1500 children will be able to attend classes there, broken up into a morning session for primary students and afternoon session for secondary students.

With the help of Numana, The Salvation Army hopes to one day serve meals in most of their rural schools. “We feel if we can provide a meal everyday at schools, that’s the best way of getting kids into school and getting people to leave the city to come to country,” said Major Busroe.

In addition to bolstering schools and school programs, The Salvation Army Haiti is looking into providing other long term services for the community in general, such as adolescent care, integrated family support, and vocational training, with the help of The Salvation Army in Canada, Switzerland, and other International Divisions.

For our latest statistics and program highlights, view our Haiti One Year Anniversary Fact Sheet at www.salvationarmyusa.org.

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