On this day in 1912, William Booth “laid down his sword”

Monday, August 20, 2012

On this day 100 years ago, Salvationists around the world were informed that their faithful leader and servant, General William Booth – Founder of The Salvation Army –…

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Hey You, Use Your Tools!

Thursday, June 21, 2012
The Salvation Army, Kendra Ketter Chavis, Guest Blogger, William Booth, Wisdom

The following was contributed by guest blogger Kendra Ketter Chavis, a speaker and Christian Lifestyle blogger (GoodGirlsHaveMoreFun.com & HowToWearAnything.com). Don’t miss her Adventures with Sally’s where she shows…

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“I’ll Fight”: 100 Years Since Booth’s Final Address

Wednesday, May 9, 2012
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Exactly 100 years ago on this day in 1912, General William Booth, founder of The Salvation Army, entered into Royal Albert Hall in London to give his last, most notable address to a packed crowd of 7,000 Salvationists. The words of his final speech are the descriptive essence of The Salvation Army’s mission and vision, precisely summing up Booth’s 60-year ministry.

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Happy Birthday, General William Booth!

Tuesday, April 10, 2012
Booth

Today is Salvation Army founder General William Booth’s birthday! He was born on April 10, 1829 in Sneinton, Nottingham, England.

Booth found his passion for teaching the gospel in 1851 when he joined the Methodist Reform Church of London as Pastor. 14 years later, he would find himself preaching to crowds on the street of London’s East End; home to the city’s most poor and destitute.

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Happy Birthday to Us!

Tuesday, July 5, 2011

HAPPY BIRTHDAY to The Salvation Army! We’re a healthy 146 years-old as this week marks the anniversary of our official founding in London, England.

It all started in 1865 when William Booth, a London minister, gave up the comfort of his pulpit and decided to take his message into the streets where it would reach the poor, the homeless, the hungry and the destitute.

His original aim was to send converts to established churches of the day, but soon he realized that the poor did not feel comfortable or welcome in the pews of most of the churches and chapels of Victorian England. Regular churchgoers were appalled when these shabbily dressed, unwashed people came to join them in worship.

Booth decided to start a church especially for them — the East London Christian Mission. The mission grew slowly, but Booth’s faith in God remained undiminished.

In May of 1878, Booth summoned his son, Bramwell, and his good friend George Railton to read a proof of the Christian Mission’s annual report. At the top it read: THE CHRISTIAN MISSION is A VOLUNTEER ARMY. Bramwell strongly objected to this wording. He was not a volunteer: he was compelled to do God’s work. So, in a flash of inspiration, Booth crossed out “Volunteer” and wrote “Salvation”. Thus, The Salvation Army was born.

In 1880, The Salvation Army officially established itself in the United States, and by the 1900s, the Army had spread around the world. We currently serve in 124 nations.

Today you’ll see us in your local communities providing shelter and food, running after school programs, serving the sick and elderly, equipping people with job and life skills, responding to disasters, and finding any way possible to meet the needs around us.

Thank you for your support that has enabled The Salvation Army to continue to serve. We hope you’ll celebrate these 146 years with us by getting to know us a little better by visiting www.salvationarmyusa.org, liking us on Facebook (@Salvation ArmyUSA), and following us on Twitter (@SalvationArmyUS). Through these sites we’ll keep you updated on ways to stay involved with us and learn more about causes close to our heart.

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This Day in History

Wednesday, March 10, 2010

On this day in history, March 10, 1880, Salvation Army founder General William Booth sent the first official group to pioneer the Army’s work in the United States. Booth founded the organization in London, England in 1865 with a mission to preach the gospel of Jesus Christ to the poor, the homeless, the hungry, and the destitute.

Salvation Army Lieutenant Eliza Shirley was actually already in the United States in 1879 after leaving England to join her parents, who had migrated to America earlier in search for work. Shirley held the first meeting of The Salvation Army in America, in Philadelphia. The Salvationists were received enthusiastically. Shirley wrote to General Booth, begging for reinforcements, but none were available at first. Glowing reports of the work in Philadelphia, however, eventually convinced Booth, in 1880, to send an official group to establish the work in America.

On March 10, 1880, Salvation Army Commissioner George Scott Railton and seven women survived the long journey from England and arrived in Battery Park in New York City. They knelt on the dockside to give thanks for their safe arrival.

At their first official street meeting, these pioneers were met with unfriendly actions, as had happened in Great Britain. They were ridiculed, arrested, and attacked. Several officers and soldiers even gave their lives. Three years later, Railton and other Salvationists had expanded their operation into California, Connecticut, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. President Grover Cleveland received a delegation of Salvation Army officers in 1886 and gave the organization a warm personal endorsement. This was the first recognition from the White House and would be followed by similar receptions from succeeding presidents.

The Salvation Army movement expanded rapidly to Canada, Australia, France, Switzerland, India, South Africa, Iceland, and local neighborhood units. Today, The Salvation Army is active in virtually every corner of the world, providing a variety of social services in 119 countries.

For more information about the history of The Salvation Army, visit our national website, or learn more about our work through our national

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