Indiana Salvation Army Receives Grant Support for Domestic Abuse Victims

Thursday, September 30, 2010

During July 2008-July 2009, 1,574 victims of domestic abuse were denied emergency shelter in Indiana due to lack of space, according to the Indiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence. During that same time period 53 deaths in the state were caused by domestic abuse.

Donna*, an abuse victim and mother of three, feared for her life but found it hard to escape from her husband’s escalating violence because she didn’t know where to go.

The Salvation Army of Indiana is doing everything they can to make sure victims find safe shelter, and they’ve just received a $30,000 grant from The Indianapolis Foundation that will help in their efforts.

The funds will support their Emergency Bed Space program run by The Salvation Army’s Women’s and Children’s Shelter, which coordinates space availability at area shelters and makes sure every spot is filled. The grant will help cover everything from meals, linens, and mattresses to housing costs and more.

Through the Emergency Bed Space program, Donna* was able to find room at a shelter for her and her children where they stayed for several months before saving up enough money for a place of their own (read her testimony here).

Since 2003, hundreds of families and individuals with stories like Donna’s* have found shelter and new beginnings through The Salvation Army Indiana’s Emergency Bed Space program, and The Indianapolis Foundation’s generous grant will help ensure hundreds more continue to do so.

Read the full story about the grant award and The Emergency Bed Space program at The Salvation Army Indiana’s website http://salvationarmyindiana.org/.

*Name changed to protect confidentiality

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Safe from the Streets

Monday, September 27, 2010

After decades of being trapped in prostitution, two women from Omaha finally escaped the streets with the help of The Salvation Army.

Today we’re sharing a little bit of their stories, as published by Omaha’s local news channel KETV ABC 7, of how they turned their lives around.

For general information on The Salvation Army’s work to fight abuse and exploitation, click here. For specific information on The Salvation Army of Omaha and its Wellspring Program, visit their website www.givesalvationarmy.org.

Former Prostitutes Tout Program As Lifesaver
Wellspring Program Helps Get Women Off Streets

KETV 7

September 27, 2010

OMAHA, Neb. — Two women, who have been working the streets of Omaha as prostitutes for more than 10 years, said they found a way out through a program sponsored by The Salvation Army.

The women said they realized their lives were going nowhere and were just getting worse. They said they got help from the Wellspring program.

With October being Domestic Violence Awareness Month, they wanted to get their stories out.

Delores (not her real name) is about 45 years old. The high school graduate and one-time college student worked the streets for more than a decade.

“While enrolled in college, I just got mixed up with the wrong people and from there it went downhill,” she said.

Delores said she turned to drugs and then to prostitution. She said she couldn’t stop.

“It was a very dangerous life I was living,” she said.

Cece (also a pseudonym) has a similar story.

“It was like an adventure. It was fun. I was like getting this money. It was fast and I really didn’t have to do nothing to get it,” she said.

Cece was a prostitute for nearly 20 years. She said what started out as being fun, eventually proved otherwise.

“Throughout those 20 years, I’ve been stabbed, I’ve been raped, I’ve been shot at,” she said. “By the grace of God, I’m sitting here telling my story today.”

If it weren’t for the Salvation Army’s Wellspring program, both women said there is no telling where they’d be.

“Prostitution isn’t a choice,” said Mary Raynovich, the director of Wellspring. “We find that it’s really about a lack of choices.”

Raynovich said she works with as many as 100 women every month. About 73 percent of them have been sexually abused and roughly 90 percent of them are chemically addicted, she said.

But, no matter how troubled some of the women are, Raynovich said they are not a lost cause.

“No matter how long you’ve been on the street, there’s hope. You can get off the street,” said Raynovich.

“I believe that if I reach out and let them (other prostitutes) know that there is hope, they will have something to cling to,” said Cece.

“If it wasn’t for our case manager in the program, I know I would still be lost,” Delores said. “I would still be out there, or dead.”

The stories from women like Cece and Delores have helped the Salvation Army secure a $25,000 grant for the Wellspring program. The check will be presented at the end of October.

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